Feathered Friends

Feathered Friends

Alongside the handful of bird-related holidays in February, there is also National Wildlife Day. One of the ways you can support wild birds, and wildlife in general, is through symbolic animal adoption; sponsoring an animal through wildlife adoptions helps support global efforts to protect wild animals and their habitats. In keeping with February’s avian focus, here are some of the birds you can adopt or sponsor through organizations like the WWF.

Blue-Footed Booby
Blue-footed Booby
Blue-Footed Bobby. (source : Pinterest).

These birds are found on various islands off the Pacific coast of South America; they survive on a fish diet. Boobies live about seventeen years and have a wingspan of nearly five feet; they use their vibrant blue feet during mating rituals.

Flamingo
Flamingo
Flamingo. (source : Pinterest).

These beautiful long-legged birds live in large flocks that can number in the thousands; their unique bills help them eat by plunging their upside-down heads and filtering for shrimp. The shrimp is what gives flamingos their bright pink color.

Golden Eagle

Golden Eagle
Golden Eagle. (source : Pinterest).

This beautiful raptor has dark brown feathers on its body and striking gold feathers on its head and neck. They can fly hundreds of miles when foraging for food; the males also make use of aerial performance during courtship.

Harpy Eagle
Harpy Eagle
Harpy Eagle. (source : Pinterest).

Harpy eagles are a key indicator of a forest ecosystem’s health; healthy harpy eagle populations tend to indicate abundant prey. They mate for life, often using the same nest year after year; these large nests are built in huge trees at least ninety feet off the ground.

 Kingfisher

Kingfisher
Kingfisher. (source : Pinterest).

These birds keep clean by diving into the water and then dry off by preening their feathers in the sun; they have fantastic vision and hunt by quickly diving for fish that swim into their view, returning to their perches afterward. During courtship, kingfishers may choose a nesting site together; these are usually along a bank and safe from flooding.

Red-Footed Booby
Red-footed Booby
Red-footed Booby. (source : Pinterest).

These birds inhabit tropic and subtropic areas of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans; they survive on a diet of fish and small octopi. Since they spend most of their time flying over water to feed they are rarely seen by humans.

Red-Tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk
Red-Tailed Hawk. (source : Pinterest).

These raptors are the most common hawks in North America; their populations are great in winter because migratory birds will migrate north to join the sedentary population. Their broad, rounded wings help them glide effortlessly through the air; when hunting, they perch high above the ground swooping down to capture prey.

 Snowy Owl

Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl. (source : Pinterest).

These vibrant white owls inhabit areas like the North American tundra, southern Scandinavia, and northern Russia; during the winter, they are sometimes even found in the US Great Plains. They have keen eyesight that makes them well-suited for night-hunting; their flight feathers have soft, downy tips that enable them to hunt noiselessly through the bleak tundra.

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