Easter Season Nibbles

Easter Season Nibbles

Today (March 2nd) is the start of Lent. Lent usually involves dietary restrictions like fasting or abstention from things like meat. I thought that it would be great to mark today, by looking at some dishes from around the world; that are associated with the Lenten and Easter seasons.

Capybara
Capybara. (credit : atlasobscura.com).

Accounts vary as to exactly when it happened, but at some point, in history, clergymen in Venezuela got the Vatican to classify a water-dwelling, web-footed, fish-tasting rodent as fish for the Lenten season. Thus it was that the capybara became a coveted Lenten consumable.

Muskrat Dinners

This is a specialty in Michigan church halls during Lent; eating this wetlands-dwelling mammal is Michigan’s Downriver Region’s part of a worldwide history of semi-aquatic rodents being considered fish for the Lenten season.

Frejon
Frejon. (credit : atlasobscure.com).

In the Brazilian quarter of Lagos, Nigeria, meat is forbidden on Good Friday. So instead, members of the community eat Frejon. Somewhere between a pudding and a soup, Frejon is made by boiling black beans until they’re soft, blending them with coconut milk into a soup or paste form, then flavoring it with sugar, salt, and cloves.

Kokoretsi
Kokoretsi. (credit : atlasobscura.com).

This Greek tradition has ancient origins; today, it involves families gathering to roast lamb on a spit. Rather than dispose of the lambs’ entrails, they are instead diced up, put on skewers, wrapped in caul fat, and spit-roasted over a charcoal fire.

Drob de Miel
Drob de Miel. (credit : atlasobscura.com).

This is the star of the Romanian Easter dinner table. First step to make this dish; is to preapred the lamb’s offal by boiling it. Then minced and mixed with garlic, onions, parsley, dill, soaked bread; and raw eggs. After that, a few hardboiled eggs are put into the mixture. Stir until the entire thing is wrapped in a caul; and it’s all baked in the oven. The finished product is enjoyed sliced, like meatloaf.

Mignon Chocolate Egg
Mignon Chocolate Egg. (credit : atlasobscura.com).

This Finnish Easter treat doesn’t involve any part of the egg beyond the shell. First, a small hole is made in the bottom of an egg until its contents are emptied. Second and last step,  is to sterelized the shells; and filled with hazelnut-almond nougat; the hole is sealed with a mixture of sugar and pea protein. The result looks like your everyday hardboiled egg.

Marzipan Easter Lamb
Marzipan Easter Lamb. (credit : atlasobscura.com).

This Sicilian treat is known in Italian; as Agnelli pasquali or pecorella di pasqua. Created from a molding of marzipan and filled with pistachio paste. This sweet sheep is more than just a treat; the Paschal or Easter Lamb is supposed to represent purity, sacrifice, and Jesus Christ.

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