Alpine A110 R: Utterly Lightweight and Aerodynamically Perfected by F1 Engineers


Sourced from Alpine

 

Alpine grants its one and only model a new trim, and it looks subtly pleasing. The A110 R is a lighter, track-focused version with no power increase, but comes with a dedicated aero package and some handling upgrades.

 

Sourced from Alpine

 

The R, which stands for Radical, is 34kg lighter than stock, which leaves it at 1081 kg; a literal featherweight of a modern sports car. The car lost its rear window, engine bay sound insulators, and gained more lightweight bucket seats, equipped with six-point harnesses. Its aero package has to be the most dedicated one in recent times, perfected by Alpine’s very own F1 engineers in a wind tunnel located in Enstone. Contrary to most aero-focused trims, the efforts for better aerodynamics go beyond mere diffusers and lip kits. It features a carbon hood with two smaller vents that improve windflow, and the removal of the rear window for a carbon fiber piece that has intakes, improving the engine’s cooling system. Speaking of cooling, the Brembo brake clampers make for better cooling. Going back to the aero, it also features a new flat undercarriage, a diffuser, a swan-neck wing that is mounted further backwards than the optional one for the S trim, and reshaped side skirts, all made of; you guessed it, carbon fiber. The exhaust has been tweaked to produce better sound, with a 3D-printed tailpipe that allows for less heat and noise to the outside. It would be a pleasure to hear the 4 cylinder without the noise insulation and a revised exhaust, though we’d like to suggest earplugs to hear more of it on the long run and not risk partial hearing loss.

 

Sourced from Alpine

 

Stiffer springs and anti-roll bars, paired with Michelin’s Pilot Sport Cup 2 semi-slicks, provide greater performance on track. This A110 sits 1 cm lower, and could be lowered by one more thanks to customizable shock absorbers. The carbon fiber wheels are different on the front and back, designed for better aerodynamics. The door card also has a pull strap, like a proper track car would. It is painted in the same shade of Racing Matt Blue that Alpine’s F1 cars have. In terms of the powertrain, it still has the same 1.8-liter turbocharged inline four that makes 300 horsepower and 251 lb-ft of torque, which still does 0-62 MPH in 3.9 seconds with a top speed of 284 km/h. The seven-speed dual clutch auto is here to stay, as well as the rear wheel drive configuration. But is there more to ask for now that it’s dressed in carbon fiber and fine-tuned by Alpine’s F1 engineers?

 

Sourced from Top Gear

 

Well, perhaps. There are 32 special editions dedicated to Fernando Alonso, an ex-driver for Alpine’s F1 team. The only differences are orange brake calipers, small badges featuring colors of the Spanish flag on the door panels and the rear quarters, and the Spaniard’s signature on the hood, also marked on the seats. The sun visor has a quote that says, “There is more than one path to the top of the mountain.”

 

Sourced from Top Gear

 

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p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38;margin-top: 0pt;margin-bottom: 0pt”>This may well be the top trim and somewhat of a sendoff to the ICE version of the new A110, unless the French decides they can top the very trim they dub the Radical, rightly earning its name for what it packs, and the efforts poured into it. It will survive via an electric version, but we will miss this mid-engined modern beauty. Though it is not time to say ‘au revoir’, the R could be a hint to its untimely denouement. A radical one at that.

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